CCP Ep. #38: Nanobots by They Might Be Giants

As the year presses on, we finally get around to reviewing our first 2013 release, the—wait for it—SIXTEENTH studio album by They Might Be Giants, called Nanobots. Join us for a peek at what they’ve been up to. From there, we begin to speculate on the next big “paradigm shift” for music (if indeed it’s coming or if it’s right around the bend).

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CCP Ep. #37: ¡Tré! by Green Day

This week we have quite the mixed bag. For starters, we’re presenting our first-ever “NO pick” review, for Green Day’s third and final installment of their trilogy, ¡Tré! Then we talk a little about the staying power of music on things such as breakups, recoveries, and fond memories — followed by a fun tangent on hipsterism!

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CCP Ep. #36: R.E.V.O. [EP] by Walk Off The Earth | Featuring Joe ‘Rude’

It’s finally time to tackle our first EP, an original work by Walk off the Earth called R.E.V.O., which we discuss alongside a selection of self-released covers. This rare combo-review comes courtesy of our guest, the enterprising thespian known as “Joe Rude” of The Kings of Karaoke and of The Society of American Fight Directors.  He tells us a bit about Karaoke as a business, and also as a haven for quelling inhibitions, one show at a time. Stick around at the end for a treat performance!

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CCP Ep. #35: The Champagne Music of Lawrence Welk | Featuring Hazel Honeysuckle

Welcome, welcome… or should I say, “thank ya, thank ya,” because this week we’re traveling to the bygone days of Lawrence Welk with his 1960s compilation album, The Champagne Music of Lawrence Welk. This review is brought to us by today’s guest, the lovely Hazel Honeysuckle, a talented NYC-based burlesque performer who enlightens us with her unique perspective on music as an on-stage tool, as well as a brief history of burlesque and its resurgence as a popular performance art.

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The Musical Cliff

Matt Storm, co-host of the Crash Chords Podcast, once proclaimed on its very first episode, “As long as human beings have creativity, they will think of something different.” That’s a proud and optimistic statement, warm to the touch but nonetheless brimming with Homosapien zealotry. I’d have loved to hop on board, and yet I couldn’t help but ponder the truth of the matter. In this glorious age of information, with genres erupting into existence at breakneck speed—via osmosis, mitosis, metamorphosis—it seems almost unthinkable that there could actually be a limit to what we can create. Indeed, this flourishing scene might sound like an artistic utopia, but the sobering irony is that quite often, the more knowledge we share, the less individuality we bring to the table; the less unique our upbringing, the more ubiquitous our artistry. So, has it come time to question whether this brave new world of ours could one day… plateau?

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