CCP Ep. #196: Three by Blue Man Group

You may know Blue Man Group from their long-running, head-turning stage productions, but in the years since their formation in 1991, the core group has also compiled a modest discography of original LPs. Their third LP, entitled Three, was released this April and showcases the group’s innovative and trademarked palette of instruments, including new contrivances of PVC piping, chimeulums, tubulums, traditional cimbaloms, and other mystery sounds! While we’re on instruments, join our topic at [1:30:28] as we debate the etiquette and ethics of borrowing proprietary musical devices.

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CCP Ep. #194: Mutant by Arca

We’re tackling Arca! Specifically, Mutant by Arca! An experimental / electronic mosaic of emotion, Mutant is an exposing project for the 26-year-old London-based Venezuelan producer, Alejandro Ghersi. Mutant may also be a challenge for certain listeners, but why falter now? Dive in with us, headlong! Also, stick around at the tail end for some brief musings on BIAS — that is, textural bias, structural bias, the creativity bias, and the “discomfort” bias. ALL kinds of bias!

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CCP Ep. #192: Varmints by Anna Meredith

Welcome to today’s discussion on Varmints by Anna Meredith, the Scottish composer most recently known for drifting between contemporary classical and electro-pop. Varmints flexes her composers’ muscles and takes her “maximalist” sensibilities just a step further, but how big of a step? Let’s find out together! And of course, check out [1:59:02] to hear a self-analytical discussion on our practice of podcast “pre-listens”, i.e., a group run-through. If we assume that tastes are contingent on whatever we’re exposed to, then what about the people we listen to music with? Do friends and colleagues affect our enjoyment of music, like a contagious wave of laughter? You tell us!

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CC: Autographs Ep. #43 – Feat. Mike Rugnetta

Today, Matt welcomes fellow Brooklyn resident, content creator, and internet personality, Mike Rugnetta. You might know Mike as host of the Idea Channel for PBS Digital Studios, or as host of the podcast Reasonably Sound. He’s also a composer (among other things). With Matt, Mike discusses the origins of the Idea Channel, a YouTube series self-described as examining “the connections between pop culture, technology, and art.” He talks about the show’s development, the origin and impact of his uniquely thorough Comment Response videos, and the active community surrounding the series. He also talks about his work with Reasonably Sound, along with his background in theater, music composition, computer science, and critical theory, all of which inform his many projects. Finally, with some inevitable asides on comics, movies, and video games (not to mention a brief hosts’-hat switcheroo), here’s presenting Matt Storm and Mike Rugnetta.

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CCP Ep. #182: PARA by Lord RAJA

This week we’re diving deep into the world of Lord RAJA (the solo project of New York-based producer Chester Raj Anand) and his latest release, PARA. Join us as we dissect the trials and triumphs of this eclectic album and stick around for our topic (at 1:28:48): an honest discussion of the two-headed monster called “Feedback”. What do we want out of it? Should we want anything? And can it can make the world a better place? Press play to find out!

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CCP Ep. #177: VEGA INTL. Night School by Neon Indian

Today we’re taking on a long-awaited “listener pick” from Doug Ferguson of the Music A to Z Podcast (one of the subjects of our 150th Episode Special‘s “music podcast” overview). Thanks to Doug, we’ll be diving into the album VEGA INTL. Night School by Neon Indian, a project of indie-electronic composer Alan Palomo. Neon Indian was also discussed in Music A to Z’s episode, “N Is For Neon Indian”, so give that a listen as well! Finally, we wrap up with a quick predictive experiment: The “thirty-year rule”… 2040s style! What elements of today’s music could potentially make their way into cultural rotation for a thirty-year resurgence? Hopes? Fears? Let’s hear ’em in the comments! And don’t forget to give Music A to Z a follow!

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CCP Ep. #176: Vulnicura by Björk

Welcome to the first episode of 2016! Join us as we kick off the new year with a new microphone and Björk’s torrid divorce album, Vulnicura, released early last year. Afterwards, we dive into some more heavy material concerning music at large: how easy it is to grow “out of touch”, internet marketing, and postcapitalism! Should be a fun year…

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CCP Ep. #163: Run by Awolnation

Try to keep pace as we have some fun with Run, the latest release by the electronic rock band Awolnation (fronted by Aaron Bruno). Poke around the album yourself first and then join us in the analysis! Or, go ahead and fast forward to 1:36:05 for a great conversation on the impact of ‘vagueness’ in music. (We’ll try to keep this as specific as possible.) Enjoy!

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CCP Ep. #159: Magnifique by Ratatat

This week, join us for an analysis of the latest work by an onomatopoeia Rocktronica favorite, the duo known as RATATAT (composed of Mike Stroud and Evan Mast). The album, Magnifique, is their fifth studio release. Also, stick around afterwards as we psycho-analyze the nightclub! Is there an impenetrable barrier or constant overlap between social mood-setters and works of substance? Is background music an art form of its own? Does a critic have any place in the debate?! These questions and not too many answers on today’s episode of CCP!

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CCP Ep. #153: Damogen Furies by Squarepusher

Acid techno. Need clarification? Unfortunately, clarity is hardly the aim of today’s artist: Squarepusher (the long-time alias of UK-based electronica artist, Tom Jenkinson). Although his music isn’t always dowsed in acid, Squarepusher’s penchant for spasmodic, lightning speed breakdowns has been a steady lure for the intellectually curious for up to 20 years. His work is hardly for everyone, but today we accept the challenge as we peer into his latest experiment, Damogen Furies. Then stick around for a discussion on how monetary transactions might actually impact our enjoyment of music. From concerts to streetside performances, do our endorphins jump ship the deeper we dig into our pockets?

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