Stormageddon Recommends… Week #9

This week I’m recommending one of my favorite songs by Death From Above 1979. The song is “Cheap Talk” off their 2014 release “The Physical World”. What I love about this band is they are everything I want out of a modern rock band with only two main instruments. Bass and drums. If you count vocals as an instrument then 3. They occasionally use synth as well but drum, bass and vocal are definitely the focus. Don’t let that fool you thou, they are so incredibly dynamic with those instruments. Jesse F. Keeler and Sebastien Grainger are easily two of the most talented musicians I’ve ever heard. If you you’re looking for something to rock out to this is your band.

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CCP Ep. #251: Colors by Beck

Beck returns (or did he really ever leave) with his newest album Colors, although the guys had to stop themselves from putting a ‘u’ in there. Unlike previous releases, Beck goes for dance with new pop producer Greg Kurstin, which may have wound up being a strange tribute to the 80’s. But Beck never really cares for labels, does he? …Should he?

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Stormageddon Recommends… Week #5

For this week’s recommendation I’m sharing a brand new record from one of my favorite artists, Andrew W.K. He is one of the kindest and most down to earth people I’ve ever met. His music and personality are raw joy and positivity. His new record is called “You’re Not Alone” and it is a cacophonous party of rock and pop. If you need a something that is fun and heartfelt this is definitely the record for you. My song focus is the single “Ever Again” which is incredibly uplifting and powerful.

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CCP Ep. #241: Humanz by Gorillaz

It’s time for everyone’s favorite (and perhaps only) virtual band! Although we’ve inspected the work of Damon Albarn before, this is our first chance to take on the Gorillaz, an unrelated ensemble of animated musicians — 2-D, Mudoc, Noodle, and Russel — who, as far as we’re concerned, are behind the music we’re hearing. On their latest album, Humanz, the Gorillaz introduce a bevy of artists, both old and new, to help with the project and take on its variety of subjects. Let’s follow along! And save room for a brief discussion on the subjectivity and flexibility of rating criteria where art is concerned.

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CCP Ep. #232: Oczy Mlody by The Flaming Lips

Oczy Mlody? …Otshee Mwodee? …Oxycodone? …Whatever it is, it’s the latest creation by alt rock veterans, The Flaming Lips. Inspired by phrases from a Polish translation of Erkine Caldwell’s novel ‘Close to Home’, Oczy Mlody is certainly a head scratcher, easing us into a dreamlike haze, surprising us in moments, and challenging our rating system like never before. Stick around after the analysis [@2:12:34] for a discussion on evolving perspectives, multiple mindsets, and the effort to avoid our own echo chambers.

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CCP Ep. #215: Tidal Wave by Taking Back Sunday

Batten down the hatches… Tidal Wave, the seventh studio album by 17-year rock veterans Taking Back Sunday, is our task for the week. Despite some occasional changes in the band lineup, the group has retained enough stability to turn out albums with consistency and class. We hope you’ll honor that consistency and join us for an analysis of the group’s latest creation, Tidal Wave. Afterwards, stick around to [2:02:20] for a preview on a little experiment of ours: Does music stack up to the 7 Basic Plots of plot-writing (as are often found in literature)? Are the journeys equatable, or does music simply go rogue?

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CCP Ep. #211: Schmilco by Wilco

Schmilco-time! Whether you know Wilco, or don’t know Wilco, then try getting to know Schmilco, as we’ll be doing in today’s episode. Though a bit of a left turn for a band that has practically earned a council seat in the hearts of a generation, Schmilco is a dreamlike saunter that dazzles in moments and reflects in others. Speaking of reflection, our topic [@ 1:41:41] takes to heart your hosts’ prior experience of today’s band and reflects on the notion of “second-hand bands”, i.e., you know ’em… you like ’em… but do you *know* them? It’s a common experience, one that can twist our perceptions of an artist for better or worse. So let’s separate the bull from the malarky and have a podcast about it, shall we?

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CCP Ep. #205: A Moon Shaped Pool by Radiohead

As a band, Radiohead has been known for a great many things… Well, as of today, let them be known as a certified Crash Chords feature! So go forth, and spread the word! And if you, perchance, harbor some opinions on this band, then you might enjoy our objective take on the band’s much-anticipated album, A Moon Shaped Pool. Join us for another roundtable “excavation” as we peel back the layers of this multi-faceted work. Afterwards, stick around for some thoughts on the role that imagery plays in music, i.e., pitting the “pure feelers” against the more optically sensitive listeners.

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CCP Ep. #201: The Getaway by Red Hot Chili Peppers

…And into the “200s” we go! To inaugurate “Season 5” of the Crash Chords Podcast, we’re sitting down with a group favorite: the music world’s funk-tastic, alt-rock failsafe for over 30 years running, the Red Hot Chili Peppers! Specifically, we’re looking at their brand new release The Getaway (their 11th studio album!) And then, being that we’re taking on such consistently funky veterans, our topic briefly examines the rarity of finding bands that are joined at the hip, and who withstand the test of time.

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CCP Ep. #196: Three by Blue Man Group

You may know Blue Man Group from their long-running, head-turning stage productions, but in the years since their formation in 1991, the core group has also compiled a modest discography of original LPs. Their third LP, entitled Three, was released this April and showcases the group’s innovative and trademarked palette of instruments, including new contrivances of PVC piping, chimeulums, tubulums, traditional cimbaloms, and other mystery sounds! While we’re on instruments, join our topic at [1:30:28] as we debate the etiquette and ethics of borrowing proprietary musical devices.

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