CCP Ep. #224: The Outtakes (V)

It’s time for that silly annual tradition of ours. See, although we do our very best to publish the tightest episodes we can muster, make no mistake: the magic wand of editing has had a generous hand in that. That being the case, for just one episode a year, let’s take a peek behind the curtain and gawk at the flubs, the blunders, the oversights, and the outright insanity. To thee we bare ourselves! Enjoy.

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CCP Ep. #223: ‘Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping’ OST by The Lonely Island

It’s day three of our five-day event series with today’s episode marking the last entry in our 2016 review season. We thought we’d end the year nice and light, dabbling into some comedy, some satire, and of course, some obnoxious pop music. Join us as we follow the rise and fall—and rise again—of protagonist Conner4Real in the summer comedy flick, Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. With the film and its original soundtrack both written by members of the The Lonely Island (who also star in the film), we’re keeping to our goal of incorporating more cross-media material… and by gum it doesn’t get more cross-media than that! Join us as we stroll through the film, wade through its myriad of cast members, and address the successes and pitfalls of both film & soundtrack as works of comedy. Enjoy!

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CCP Ep. #222: Scattering by Progger

A “prog” band named Progger — oy, now we’ve heard everything! Indeed, after hearing the Austin-based band’s latest project Scattering (an album that sprung from a collaboration with the band’s newest New York-based members) our horizons have been markedly broadened. Incorporating elements of jazz, prog, funk, and a hefty dose of name-your-poison, Scattering is no aperitif; it’s the full meal. So join us for an in-depth analysis of this gripping work and also for a brief preview on some New Year’s homework: the ultimate mystery genre game. Let’s dig deep and ring in 2017 with shock & awe.

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CCP Ep. #221: “Awaken, My Love!” by Childish Gambino

Happy New Year from Crash Chords! Due in part to the holidays, but mostly to flu season, we took a short break and now it’s time to play catch up! It’s the race to Ep. #225 as we kick off the year with FIVE consecutive days of the Crash Chords Podcast. Today we commence with the first in the lineup by following through with our December guest’s own listener pick. Many thanks to Mike Rugnetta for spurring us to tackle the third signed album by Childish Gambino—that is, the stage name and alias for actor and comedian Donald Glover—euphorically titled “Awaken, My Love!” Come join us for an analysis of the album and also for a discussion on music suggestions that always seem to come with warnings and caveats.

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CCP Ep. #220: ‘Without My Enemy What Would I Do’ by Made in Heights | Feat. Mike Rugnetta

Here’s a proposition: a three-hour long Mike Rugnetta extravaganza! In the wake of his appearance on ‘Crash Chords: Autographs’, in CCA Ep. #43, we’re pleased to re-introduce the one, the only, Mike Rugnetta for the full Crash Chords experience. Famed for hosting the PBS Idea Channel, a popular internet series that examines “the connections between pop culture, technology, and art”, Mike sits in for a 30 min. follow-up interview, during which we prod into some new features on the Idea Channel, Mike’s long-held interest in critical theory, the re-launch of his Reasonably Sound podcast, and fittingly, his own compositions. Finally, @ 0:29:20, we commence with the big tamale: quality time spent in a succulent critical analysis of Mike’s album of choice, Without My Enemy What Would I Do by Made in Heights. With Mike fully in his element (and the rest of us seated & caffeinated), all that’s missing is a dutiful audience! To join in, just chew on the album a bit, strap in, ponder, and play.

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CCP Ep. #219: Monument Builders by Loscil

Let’s have a look at an album called Monument Builders by Loscil, a project by composer Scott Morgan. An ambient/electronica work at its core, Monument Builders was inspired by the Philip Glass score to the experimental film Koyaanisqatsi. The album spurs us to tackle a rare form of composition—the Vancouver native’s unique brand of structured ambient minimalism—before entering our follow-up discussion on the importance of volume in music. (Hint: it’s pretty important.)

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CCP Ep. #218: 50 by Rick Astley

We just wanna tell you how we’re feeling; gotta make you understand…. the power of analysis. As the title suggests, Rick Astley is 50! After taking an extended hiatus in order to raise a family, he’s finally back to celebrate his age and other fortunes in his new album, aptly titled 50. Join us for a breakdown of 50, and also for a hefty discussion [@ 1:36:40] on the ‘memification’ of music, comedy, and social media art. So please, don’t give us up, and don’t let us down… because we know the game, and yes, we’re gonna play it.

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CCP Ep. #217: Eno by Second Relation

We’ve got an exciting project lined up for you today: the Austrian rock band Second Relation and their third album Eno. Peppered with the perks of pop music and the soul-satisfying rewards of art rock, Eno is a must-experience for progressive rock fans and music lovers in general. You know the drill; listen to the album yourself first, then join us in a track-by-track analysis of Eno and Second Relation’s fascinating attempt at musical portraiture. Afterwards, stick around for some brief theorizing on whether we, as people, have personal “themes”—simple narratives that the media we consume could easily, or not so easily, portray.

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CCP Ep. #216: You Want It Darker by Leonard Cohen

Clear your day for Leonard Cohen. (Well, a least a portion of it.) With his soft vocals and poetic flair, Leonard Cohen has been speaking to a generation of poets as well as musicians ever since the 1960s. Today we’ll be speaking to both camps as we take on Cohen’s latest album You Want It Darker. Also, stick around for a brief compare & contrast discussion on universality and general appeal vs. the personal effect and specificity.

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[Edit: This episode was released three days before Leonard Cohen’s unfortunate passing. We are deeply saddened by his loss and we hope this episode is taken as a celebration of his work, despite its ill-timed release. The following interpretations of his final album and life’s work are opinion-based and, we hope, considerate of his legacy.]

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CCP Ep. #215: Tidal Wave by Taking Back Sunday

Batten down the hatches… Tidal Wave, the seventh studio album by 17-year rock veterans Taking Back Sunday, is our task for the week. Despite some occasional changes in the band lineup, the group has retained enough stability to turn out albums with consistency and class. We hope you’ll honor that consistency and join us for an analysis of the group’s latest creation, Tidal Wave. Afterwards, stick around to [2:02:20] for a preview on a little experiment of ours: Does music stack up to the 7 Basic Plots of plot-writing (as are often found in literature)? Are the journeys equatable, or does music simply go rogue?

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